Favorite Products

STABILO point 88

The perfect companion for schoolchildren, students and professionals.
More Info

STABILO SENSOR

For a relaxed feeling whilst writing – the tip does not bend or break.
More Info

STABILO pointMax

Your favorite ballpoint pen, but even better!
More Info

STABILO worker

The tool for hard work with an indestructible rollerball tip and a non-slip smooth shaft.
More Info

STABILO point 88

The perfect companion for schoolchildren, students and professionals.

STABILO SENSOR

For a relaxed feeling whilst writing – the tip does not bend or break.

STABILO pointball

Your favourite ballpoint pen, but even better!

STABILO worker+

The tool for hard work with an indestructible rollerball tip and a non-slip smooth shaft.

Writing like never before

Whether it’s just a few notes and underlining words, writing an extensive essay, doodling in class, meeting notes in the office or just a quick note to friends, STABILO is up to the challenge!

Good to know

For a relaxed feeling whilst writing – the tip does not bend or break.

1928 – a day like any other. In the paint shop of the Schwan pencil factory in Nuremberg a batch of pencils rattled through the coating machine. The freshly-painted wooden shafts gleamed brightly as they left the machine. But something was not quite right… The foreman and machine operator discovered to their horror that the hexagonal pencils all had light stripes at the edges. However, what at first seemed to be a mishap turned out to be an important design feature. Since then, Schwan pencils have been deliberately given light stripes down the edges, with this typical brand recognition feature registered as a trade mark that very same year.

Is STABILO point 88 ink permanent?

Some 50,000 years ago our ancestors were still chiselling stories in stone with flint and painting on the walls of their caves with plant dyes. For thousands of years, pictures were their only means of communication. The ancient Romans used a stylus made of pewter or lead to write on wax tablets, papyrus or parchment. Implements made of lead, pewter and silver were used for writing and drawing until the late Middle Ages. Change came with the discovery of graphite in England around 1550: this new material was soon known throughout Europe.